The Heros Adventure

Watch Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth: “The Heros Adventure” and respond to the following: 1. How does Campbell explain the hero’s thousand faces? What is the hero’s deed? 2. Why is the hero’s journey so universal? In what way does everyone need to undertake this journey? What kinds of transformations of the hero take place as a result of this journey? 3. What do the three tests of the Buddha and the three tests of Jesus represent in terms of the hero’s journey? 4. What does Campbell have to say about the hero’s transformation of consciousness? What is that? How does it happen? 5. What points does Campbell make using Star Wars? What does the old stranger (here: Obiwan Kenobi) give the young hero-to-be (here: Luke Skywalker)? About technology? About Han Solo’s character? About the cantina scene? The garbage compacter? Darth Vader? At 26:43, Campbell says, “I don’t think [The Hero with a Thousand Faces] will help you to change the system, but it would help you to live within the system as a human being.” What does he mean? 6. Explain the following quotation from Campbell: “The achievement of the hero is one that he is ready for, and it is really a manifestation of his character. And it’s amusing the way in which the landscape and the conditions of the environment match the readiness of the hero. The adventure that he’s ready for is the one that he gets.” 7. What happens to Siegfried the dragonslayer once he slays the dragon? 8. What does Campbell illustrate using the story about the young native American woman and her snake husband? 9. What does the European dragon do and represent? What does it have to do with the ego? What kind of metaphorical dragons does he mention? 10. At 46:41, Campbell states “what myths are for.” How does he explain the meaning of myth here? What is myth for?

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